Part of Plant Used


Processing


Origin



Mexico

Active Ingredients



Volatile oil, phthalides, coumarins, flavenoids, vitamins, iron

Parsley - Mexico

​​CPetroselinum crispin




Leaves, roots, seeds


Whole, fresh, dried, flaked, powdered, essnetial oil
Parsley is a member of the carrot family and is the most popular herb in the world. What most people don’t know is that the leaf is highly nutritious. In fact, parsley is a good source of alpha-linolenic acid, beta-carotene, folic acid, calcium and vitamins A, B-12, C and K.

​Use the powdered herb as you would dried flakes—for seasoning foods. Parsley powder can also be encapsulated as a dietary supplement. 

Parsley or garden parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a species of Petroselinum in the family Apiaceae, native to the central Mediterranean region (southern Italy, Algeria, and Tunisia), naturalized











​elsewhere in Europe, and widely cultivated as a herb, a spice, and a
vegetable.

​Where it grows as a biennial, in the first year, it forms a rosette of tripinnate
leaves 10–25 cm long with numerous 1–3 cm leaflets, and a tap root used
​as a food store over the winter. Parsley is widely used in Middle Eastern,
European, and American cooking. Curly leaf parsley is often used as a
​garnish. In central and eastern Europe and in western Asia, many dishes
are served with fresh green chopped parsley sprinkled on top. Root parsley is very common in central and eastern European cuisines, where it is used as a snack or a vegetable in many soups, stews, and casseroles.

Culinary use
Parsley is widely used in Middle Eastern, European, and American cooking. Curly leaf parsley is used often as a garnish. In











​central and eastern Europe and in western Asia, many dishes are served with fresh green, chopped parsley sprinkled on top. Green parsley is used frequently as a garnish on potato dishes (boiled or mashed potatoes), on rice dishes (risotto or pilaf), on fish, fried chicken, lamb, goose, and steaks, as well in meat or vegetable stews (such as beef bourguignon, goulash, or chicken paprikash). In southern and central Europe, parsley is part of bouquet garni, a bundle of fresh herbs used as an ingredient in stocks, soups, and sauces. Freshly chopped green parsley is used as a topping for soups such as chicken soup, green salads, or salads such as Salade Olivier, and on open sandwiches with cold cuts or pâtés.

Parsley is a key ingredient in several Middle Eastern salads such as tabbouleh. Persillade is a mixture of chopped garlic and chopped parsley in French cuisine. Gremolata, a mixture of parsley, garlic, and lemon zest, is a traditional accompaniment to the Italian veal stew, ossobuco alla milanese.

​Parsley is the main ingredient in Italian salsa verde, which is a mixed condiment of parsley, capers, anchovies, garlic, and bread soaked in vinegar. It is an Italian custom to serve it with bollito misto or fish.

Root parsley is very common in central and eastern European cuisines, where it is used as a snack or a vegetable in many soups, stews, and casseroles.

In England, parsley sauce is a roux-based sauce, commonly served over fish or gammon.

​In Serbia it is used as an ingredient for broth.Health benefits and precautions
​Parsley is a source of Flavonoid, and Antioxidants (especially luteolin), apigenin,[15] folic acid, vitamin K, vitamin C, and vitamin A. Half a of tablespoon (a gram) of dried parsley contains about 6.0 µg of lycopene and 10.7 µg of alpha carotene as well as 82.9 µg ofLutein+Zeaxanthin and 80.7 µg of beta carotene. Excessive consumption of parsley should be avoided by pregnant women. It is safe in normal food quantities, but large amounts may have uterotonic effects. 

Leaf parsley
The two main groups of parsley used as herbs are curly leaf (i.e.) (P. crispum crispum group; syn. P. crispum var. crispum) and Italian, or flat leaf (P. crispum neapolitanum group; syn. P. crispum var. neapolitanum); of these, the neapolitanum group more closely resembles the natural wild species. Flat-leaved parsley is preferred by some gardeners as it is easier to cultivate, being more tolerant of both rain and sunshine, and has a stronger flavor, (though this is disputed) while curly leaf parsley is preferred by others because of its more decorative appearance in garnishing. A third type, sometimes grown in southern Italy, has thick leaf stems resembling celery.