Culinary



Green peppercorns are the key ingredient in traditional peppercorn sauce. Use whole or cracked in cooking.

Part of Plant Used



Berries


Madagascar



Green Peppercorns, India

Piper nigrum




Whole peppercorn retains flavor longer than ground pepper.

Good vs Bad


Active ingredients


Processing



Whole, dried or powdered

Origin



Why buy?



Green peppercorns are fresh and flavorful, but milder than black pepper.


piperine, safrole, beta-pinene, limonene, terpinene, alpha-pinene, various sesquiterpenes and monoterpene derivatives, including borneol, carvone, carvacrol, 1,8-cineol and linalool 
Green peppercorns are the unripe fruits of the same tropical vine that table ground pepper comes from. In contrast to black peppercorns, green peppercorns have a milder, fresher flavor with less 
“bite” to the tongue.

Whole green peppercorns are commonly used in French cuisine, especially
​in sauces and in pickling brines. 

Green peppercorns appear smooth and shiny, in contrast to black
​peppercorns that are wrinkly and rough. This is because green peppercorns
are harvested long before maturity and are not permitted to ferment during the












​drying process. While green peppercorns are sometimes pickled in brine to prevent fermentation, they are also freeze-dried or air-dried and sold as a spice to be used whole or cracked.

​Whole dried green peppercorns are the type used to make peppercorn sauces served with roasted chicken, seafood or Steak au Poivre. Green peppercorns are also used in Thai, Cajun and Creole cuisines.